Prolific Author Dorothy Clarke Wilson Comes Back to Life

The words of prolific, award winning author Dorothy Clarke Wilson have once again experienced a renewed surge of popularity in mainstream literary market genres including historical fiction, and biographical works.

Rejuvenated works of Dorothy Clarke Wilson have experienced a resurgence in today's print and digital marketplace. Following reprint and publication efforts in 2012, Wilson's impeccable command of narrative, dialogue and prose continues to propel her to the top as one of reader favorites and literature's most prolific authors. Renewed interest in her works is well deserved.

Wilson's religious-historical fiction and biographical works were popular favorites for generations. Wilson brought historical religious fiction to readers with her republication of, "The Awakening of Jesus," and her original 1984 work titled, "The Brothers, James and Jesus", a story about Jesus' brother Saint James. One of her most popular works, "Moses - The Prince of Egypt," published in 1949, sold over 500,000 copies in paperback and served as the foundation for the Charlton Heston epic, "The Ten Commandments," directed by Cecil B. DeMille. Another favorite work, originally published in 1955 and titled, "Jezebel - The Wicked Woman of the Bible," amassed rave reviews from literary journals and newspapers such as the Boston Globe and the New York Mirror, which stated, "Dorothy Clarke Wilson gives the feel of reality to the hills and streams of the land of the prophets. It is the ancient Bible story retold in modern language."

Clarke was not only a beloved author, but also philanthropist and peace activist. She has authored over 200 works in over 450 publications - works that can be found in over 16,000 libraries throughout the United States. Dorothy Clarke Wilson's historical fiction and biographical works have stood the test of time. Her novels and biographies have recently experienced resurgence as downloadable digital publications from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and iTunes as well.

Of "Jezebel - Wicked Woman of the Bible", The Christian Advocate wrote, "Mrs. Wilson lifts the story from the musty pages of history and weaves a lively tale... illuminating and drama-packed... when the movies get Jezebel, she should emerge as a fiery mixture of Lady Macbeth, Eva Peron, and Tallulah Bankhead."

Wilson's works and persona have touched millions. She was granted an honorary degree of doctor of letters from Bates College in 1948 and the University of Maine in 1984. Honored in 1988 with the Marianne Hartman Award and in 1989 with the Deborah Moore Award given by Westbrook College, her passion and focus for peace and social justice is well known among philanthropists. She was recognized her with the New England United Methodist Award for Excellence in Social Justice Ministry in the mid-70s, and honored by the American Association of University Women in 1988.

The Boston Globe succinctly described Wilson's ability to write unforgettable narrative and immerse her readers into distant settings and scenarios: "Faithful to the bare outline in the Old Testament, this novel [Jezebel] unfolds a powerful story about Ahab, king of Israel, and his queen, the Tyrian Princess Jezebel. In the telling there is marshaled a rich pageantry, vigorous and sinewy in his description of battles and imaginative in its reconstruction of an era."

In honor of her philanthropy, compassion and strive for excellence, the University of Maine honors Wilson's memory annually by offering students the Dorothy Clarke Wilson Peace Awards - certainly a fitting legacy to a gifted woman who made such a huge impact through her writing, words, and actions.

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