Researchers Successfully Identify Abnormal Prostaglandins In Baldness

Scientists have managed to successfully identify the abnormal amounts of prostaglandins in the scalps of men suffering from male pattern baldness.

Scientists and researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have successfully identified the abnormal amount of Prostaglandin D2 in the scalps of men suffering from male pattern baldness. The recent discovery may directly influence the development of new treatments for the most common reason for hair loss in men. Researchers found that a prostaglandin called PGD2 and its derivative, 15-dPGJ2 are both responsible for inhibiting hair growth.

8 out of every 10 men under the age of 70 suffer from male pattern baldness. The condition strikes the hair follicles causing them to shrink and produce microscopic hairs that grow for a much shorter duration of time than normal follicles.

By taking an unbiased approach to looking for biological causes of baldness and looking into scalp issues from balding and non-bald spots in men with male pattern baldness and corroborating their findings in mouse models, they were able to find that PGD2 levels were elevated in bald scalp tissues at levels 3 times higher than their findings in scalps of men with androgenetic alopecia.

Prostaglandins play a necessary role in a variety of bodily functions like controlling cell growth and dilating and constricting smooth muscle tissues. A different prostaglandin, F2alpha, is known to help increase hair growth. Scientists have found that while PGD2 inhibits the growth of hair, other prostaglandins enhance and regulate the speeds of new hair growth.

While studies were only conducted on male patients, researchers believe that prostaglandins may indicate a common link shared by women and men with AGA. Studies in the future will help determine if targeting prostaglandins in women with AGA will also prove beneficial.

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