Julie A Jacko: Handbook Unlocks Science of Mood Sensing iPhone

As Apple patents a mood sensing smartphone that delivers content according to user's emotions,interest in the field of human computer interaction, which Dr Julie A Jacko specializes in, has renewed.

With Apple filing a patent for a mood sensing iPhone, the future of interactive technology as predicted by celebrated academician Dr Julie A. Jacko is becoming a reality. In her book "Human-Computer Interaction Handbook", Dr Jacko has talked about the present and future applications of HCI. Apple is developing a smartphone that will infer "user mood based on user and group characteristic data". The unobtrusive mood-detection will pick cues from "recently consumed content" such as "a digital media item, a social networking activity, and/or an invitational content item response". Recent advanced product launches also include headphones, by Japanese company Neurowear, that scan brainwaves to select music on the smartphone. With unprecedented progress in interactive technology, Dr Jacko is making important contributions to the discussion around technology that adapts according to the user's emotions.

Exploring the evolution in how people use and work with technology, The Human-Computer Interaction Handbook captures the most important scientific know-how in the field of HCI. The third edition features contributions from over 130 eminent researchers and professionals in the field worldwide. As co-editor, Dr Jacko has covered several advanced topics such as the role of cognition in HCI, sensor-based interactions, tangible interfaces, wearable computers, ubiquitous computing, and adaptable systems.

Dr Jacko is a leading expert in the design, implementation, and evaluation of interactive computing systems in complex domains such as population health and health care delivery, with the purpose of enhancing human performance and satisfaction. Her research is focused on the cognitive processes underlying the interaction of people with complex systems. For instance, her research paper that investigates the engagement of the visual cortex of visually impaired patients while performing computer-based tasks will help in better understanding of how we perform visual search. The ultimate goal of her research is the development of engineering models of human performance that can aid in the design of real-world systems. For her stellar work, she was awarded the National Science Foundation Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor awarded to young investigators by the U.S. government.

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