Highwire Records to Re-release Kazyak's See the Forest, See the Trees

Highwire Records will re-release Kazyak's See the Forest, See the Trees EP on July 16, 2014. This will be the debut release by the new independent record label from Bloomington, Indiana. The label has two other releases set for 2014.

Highwire Records will re-release Kazyak's See the Forest, See the Trees EP on July 16, 2014. Kazyak, led by Minneapolis native and craftsman Peter Frey, has shared the stage with many; including LA indie rockers The Local Natives and Duluth-based Trampled by Turtles.

Highwire, whose name is inspired by the acclaimed documentary-film Man on Wire, is managed by ex-blogger Kevin Flick (Puddlegum), singer-songwriter Marshall Lewis, and Frey. Flick explains, "Our strategy is to choose artists carefully and go deep. Kazyak produces heartfelt, indie art that I think should be exposed to a wider audience, and this record sets the standard for future Highwire releases. Frey has lots of music up his sleeve and I hope this is the beginning of a long-lasting relationship." The label has two other releases set for 2014.

Songwriter/guitarist Peter Frey is known for experimentation. As a kid, Frey waded in a pool of midwestern music, absorbing the abstract side of Bob Dylan's songwriting and lofty sonic architecture from the likes of 12 Rods, Fat Kid Wednesdays, Halloween Alaska, and Bon Iver. On the new record, Frey spits it all back out in his own way: The warmth of a nylon-string guitar blended around an expressive falsetto, the electronic drum sequences layered beneath a live Ludwig kit, and an acoustic banjo processed through circuit-bent guitar pedals.

See the Forest, See the Trees chronicles the famous Remus folktale Tar Baby, a child-like aphorism for a problem than only worsens by attempts to solve it. The album's title is a variation on the old adage of "not seeing the forest for the trees," where Frey strived to simultaneously mind the finer details and the big picture. Each song is a snapshot, a thread in a tapestry, and though you never get the sense that there's a rigid theme or set of rules to the story, you can't help but feel that each song is connected on multiple levels.