Cryptography Pioneers Receive The 2012 A.M. Turing Award

The Association for Computing Machinery has announced the two new recipients of the Alan M. Turing award this 2013.

The Association for Computing Machinery has announced the two new recipients of the Alan M. Turing award this 2013. The two recipients are both researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology namely ShafiGoldwasser and Silvio Micali. Goldwasser and Micali have both worked in the field of probable security that laid the mathematical foundations making the modern cryptography possible. The award has been given in the field of software development and to those individuals who have made tremendous changes in the field. This will be regarded as a mark of pioneering efforts in the field making useful innovations in the software industry.

The Association for Computing Machinery has started to give the A.M. Turing award since 1966 to give new recognition for pioneers who continuously exert their effort in developing new innovations and ideas that would help push through technological trends and software development in the industry. The award is named after the British Mathematician Alan M. Turing for his great contributions to computing industry and the use of software for easier manipulation and management of tasks. The award includes a US$250,000 prize with financial support of Google and Intel.

The encryption schemes running today's browser has met Goldwasser and Micali'snotion of security. This lead to the awarding of the prize to the two pioneers who have collaborated well in securing one of the solid foundations of the software industry. This would also project new innovations and subtle changes to specific platforms used in the software industry. Vint Cerf, ACM president and former Turing award recipient, said that the method of encrypting credit card numbers when shopping on the net meets their test. He further added that the contribution of the two in the software industry added a new face and meaning to the ensuring security in the digital age.

The two recipients created a mathematical structure that would be able to formalize the concept cryptographic security had to be computational rather than absolute. With this, they were able to devise a new platform for ensuring security in the digital technology. This turned out cryptography from art to science. Their work has also able to address vital practical problems like the protection of data from being modified which provides a more secured means of communication in the internet. With this, security over the internet would be much more aptly fitting to the ever evolving phase of social media and the use of the web as a means of communication for most of us. Custom software development would also find its way in making more subtle changes with these innovative options.

The two recipients have also contributed well to the area of classifying computational problems according to their inherent difficulty. They have been able to lead the notion of interactive and probabilistic tools according to the ACM. The innovations made by Goldwasser and Micali will help in securing a more definite form of usage of the information over the internet. This would even help other fields like database development and the whole of the software industry when it comes to innovative approaches for the digital age.